“She Kills Monsters” Review

Photo+of+Kobe+Chindlund+and+Isaac+Tominsky+in+the+play+%22She+Kills+Monsters%22
Back to Article
Back to Article

“She Kills Monsters” Review

Photo of Kobe Chindlund and Isaac Tominsky in the play

Photo of Kobe Chindlund and Isaac Tominsky in the play "She Kills Monsters"

Photo of Kobe Chindlund and Isaac Tominsky in the play "She Kills Monsters"

Photo of Kobe Chindlund and Isaac Tominsky in the play "She Kills Monsters"

Matthew Gearhart, Opinions Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






“She Kills Monsters” slaughtered expectations with its sarcastic humor, conversation over teenage issues, and it’s intriguing teenage drama. That breaks the audiences strict comfortability, with a mature edge. But what makes this play so unique from any other play is it’s daring action sequences. From kicks, punches and sword fights all the way to slit throats, this geeked out play as no shortage of wicked brawls that leave the audience staring in awe. 

This play wouldn’t be as action-packed without the strenuous process of learning fighting scenes. That adds a layer of complexity to the creation of “She Kills Monsters.”

“In total, there are over 20 parts of the play that require stage combat in varying degrees. It takes a significant amount of time to put these parts together safely and in a way that supports the overall story,” said Kyle Woolums, the drama director of the play

“It started out with just lines and running in circles, and blocking planned hits from the other characters. Then actors added their own pizzazz. And we repeat the same action scenes over and over,” Kobe Chindlind 21’, who performed as Miles, the boyfriend of the main character, Angus.

The actors and actresses strictly practiced action scenes for their first 8 rehearsals. And these action sequences molded the play into a unique performance, unlike any other play.

“Nearly no-one in the cast had ever done fighting scenes like this before,” said Liesl Bucknell 22’. 

From Angus fighting bugbears to the final boss dragon. The Wash drama department proved to us how complex of a stage performance they can compose. These scenes especially prove that.

Though the action was not the only contributing factor to the play’s entertainment. “She Kills Monsters” is full of teenage drama and real-life issues. Relationships, coming out of the closet, and a death in the family. The story visits a wide arrange of life hurdles. The story follows as the characters try to overcome these. This adds a layer of sophistication that gives the story depth, and kept the audience intrigued. 

“Theatre plays an important role in starting conversations about challenging aspects of life. It can also enlighten us about how to overcome certain challenges or at least give us more ways to process what life throws at us. While this particular play is themed around Dungeons and Dragons, it also speaks to more universal themes–bullying, homophobia, sisterhood, and grief & loss. These are issues that students in our community have to deal with.” said Kyle Woolums. 

While the chaotic and complex action sequences were a huge factor in the quality and performance of the play. It was the vulgar realism, message of acceptance, and bluntness that made this play a large portion of the audience can relate to. It was an overall entertaining performance.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email