China Trade War is hitting Iowa Farmers 

Example+of+Iowa+Farming+by+cwwycoff1

Example of Iowa Farming by cwwycoff1

Matthew Gearhart, Opinions Editor

Matthew Gearhart

”Farming is perhaps the most physically taxing form of gambling. Every year, farmers take out loans to pay for sowing and harvesting a crop. They must buy the right seed, plant and harvest at the right time. All along, they bear the risk of Mother Nature ruining everything.” The Guardian stated.

Along with the risk of agricultural labor, farmers in especially Iowa must face a new opponent. The escalation of a trade war between China and the U.S. is becoming more of a reality. After the U.S. imposed a 25 percent tariff on 818 Chinese goods. The Chinese government swiftly snapped back with their own set of tariffs. A tariff is a tax or duty to be paid on a particular class of imports or exports, often used in international trade. Business insider reported the latest round of tariffs now brings the total amount of goods flowing between the two countries that are subject to duties up to $106 billion and further escalates the trade war.

The long list of products includes farming equipment, farming products like soybeans which are a key crop for agriculturalists in a state like Iowa. The Guardian reports that these tariffs would cost farmers in Iowa up to $624 million.

All six members of Iowa’s congressional delegation wrote a letter to the White House on June 25, “We remain concerned about the impacts of these retaliatory tariffs from our major trading partners on Iowa agriculture products coming to fruition. We strongly urge you to quickly resolve our trade differences and avoid a trade war.”

“The farm economy is not good right now at all as we all know and if something don’t change, there is going to be a lot of farmers going bankrupt,” Said Ryan Michaelson a farmer who works outside Duncombe, in north central Iowa.

It’s not all downfall though. Grants have been given to farmers for decades to aid farmers and Trump just implemented a $12 billion emergency aid to farmers across the U.S. stuck in the cross fire of the trade war.