The Surveyor

Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

Julie+Cain%2C+one+of+Wash%27s+Japanese+teachers%2C+who+won+National+Japanese+Teacher+of+the+Year.
Julie Cain, one of Wash's Japanese teachers, who won National Japanese Teacher of the Year.

Julie Cain, one of Wash's Japanese teachers, who won National Japanese Teacher of the Year.

Julie Cain, one of Wash's Japanese teachers, who won National Japanese Teacher of the Year.


Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Ambitious. Brave. Energetic. Fabulous. Yes! These adjectives all describe our very own Julie Cain, who has been teaching Japanese at Wash for 20 years. Cain was recently recognized by The American Association of Teachers of Japanese and was named the National Japanese Teacher of the Year.

Cain got her undergraduate degree at Grinnell College and masters from the University of Iowa. She student taught at Wash and walked right into her job in ’98. This year, Cain only teaches Japanese two periods a day and the rest of her time is spent being an IDS which stands for an instructional design strategist. She is assigned to teachers and helps excellent teachers become even better.

“I love the variety of students I get. I love that, in my particular job, I theoretically get them all four years, this is changing because I have a different job now, but I see the kids grow up. They come in as babies, and they leave as young men and women. It’s a real privilege to be apart of that and help form who they become. I know that only like 5% of my students will ever study Japanese outside of my classroom and I’m okay with that because I love being able to share my passion and love of the culture and language with my students, to maybe give them a piece of that so they can carry that with them. Teaching a foreign language, I love that I can impact students that may never leave Iowa, may never leave Cedar Rapids, some of my students, that’s just not their family dynamic that they can do that. So I can show them that the world is bigger than what they experience here at the Southeast side,” said Cain.

Cain works to get to know her students, which is an admirable attribute. “I think I get to know not just my students, but I try and learn all the students which is also why I went the leadership route. I want to have more interactions with more kids and positively impact all kids. I think part of why I am successful with my students is that I treat them like adults, but adults who still have things to learn. I share with them that I’m still learning and that they’re still learning. Maybe not adults, I treat them as humans like they have feelings and they have stressors in their lives, and I try to figure out how we can work around those things that they perceive as barriers and get what needs done, done. I care about them as individuals and what they do, who they are, how they feel. I genuinely care,” Cain said.

Cain’s positive attitude doesn’t go unnoticed amongst her students either, “I like how Cain Sensei is always positive no matter what is going on, especially since I know a lot of the students in the classes can be negative. She really just tries to stay happy to bring up the mood,” said Mia Rampaul ’18.

Another unique feature of Cain includes her commitment to taking students on a three week trip to Japan. This started the very first year she taught. Cain has been to Japan 11 times, nine with Wash students and is planning a trip for this summer as well. On her trip in ’16, as many Wash families know, one of the students who was attending the trip, Glenna Houtz, was diagnosed with Leukemia, “Julie is basically family to me. The compassion and help she showed my parents and I while in Okinawa is something we will never forget. When I think of Julie, I think of a kind, hard-working woman who would be there for anyone in their time of need,” said Houtz.

Houtz’s mother took it upon herself to nominate Cain for about every teacher award that is out there. Although this particular award that Cain received celebrates her accomplishments as a teacher, the Surveyor staff wants to acknowledge that Cain should be celebrated for so much more than that.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




*

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    Bathroom Pass? I’ll Pass.

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    Are Show Choir and Marching Band Sports?

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    Guest Column: Whose Lives Matter?

  • OPINION

    Thanks-taking

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    Staff Editorial: National Anthem Protests

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    A Storm of Controversy

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    How old is too old to Trick or Treat?

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    Staff Editorial: African-American Class Not So LIT

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    An Herbivore’s perspective

  • Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year

    OPINION

    PE Waiver Policy

The student news site of Cedar Rapids George Washington High School
Staff Editorial: Julie Cain Wins National Japanese Teacher of the Year